Category Archives: Statistics

The nature of science in 2051

Right now scientific questions are chosen for study in a largely autocratic way. Typically grants for research on particular questions come from federal funding agencies, and scientists competitively apply with the money going to the chosen researcher via a peer … Continue reading

Posted in Open Science, Reproducible Research, Statistics | 1 Comment

Generalize clinicaltrials.gov and register research hypotheses before analysis

Stanley Young is Director of Bioinformatics at the National Institute for Statistical Sciences, and gave a talk in 2009 on problems in modern scientific research. For example: 1 in 20 NIH-funded studies actually replicates; closed data and opacity; model selection … Continue reading

Posted in Open Science, Peer Review, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Statistics, Talks | Leave a comment

My Symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting: The Digitization of Science

Yesterday I held a symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington DC, called “The Digitization of Science: Reproducibility and Interdisciplinary Knowledge Transfer,” that was intended to bring attention to how massive computation is changing the practice of science, particularly … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Intellectual Property, Law, Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Software, Statistics, Talks, Technology | Leave a comment

Startups Awash in Data: Quantitative Thinkers Needed

We know unix logs everything, which makes web-based data collection easy, in fact almost difficult not to do. As a result internet startups often find themselves gathering enormous amounts of data, for example site use patterns, click-streams, user demographics and … Continue reading

Posted in Software, Startups, Statistics, Technology | 3 Comments

Open Data Dead on Arrival

In 1984 Karl Popper wrote a private letter to an inquirer he didn’t know, responding to enclosed interview questions. The response was subsequently published and in it he wrote, among other things, that: “Every intellectual has a very special responsibility. … Continue reading

Posted in Developing world, Intellectual Property, Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Software, Statistics, Technology | 6 Comments

Ars technica article on reproducibility in science

John Timmer wrote an excellent article called “Keeping computers from ending science’s reproducibility.” I’m quoted in it. Here’s an excellent follow up blog post by Grant Jacobs, “Reproducible Research and computational biology.”

Posted in Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Software, Statistics, Technology, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

My answer to the Edge Annual Question 2010: How is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?

At the end of every year editors at my favorite website The Edge ask intellectuals to answer a thought-provoking question. This year it was “How is the internet changing the way you think?” My answer is posted here: http://www.edge.org/q2010/q10_15.html#stodden

Posted in Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, shameless self-promotion, Statistics, Technology | Leave a comment

Post 2: The OSTP’s call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government

The following comments were posted in response to the second wave of the OSTP’s call as posted here: http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/default-file/RFI%20Final%20for%20FR.pdf. The first wave, comments posted here and on the OSTP site here (scroll to the second last comment), asked for feedback … Continue reading

Posted in Intellectual Property, Law, Open Science, OSTP, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Software, Statistics, Technology | 4 Comments

The Climate Modeling Leak: Code and Data Generating Published Results Must be Open and Facilitate Reproducibility

On November 20 documents including email and code spanning more than a decade were leaked from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at East Anglia University in the UK. The Leak Reveals a Failure of Reproducibility of Computational Results It appears … Continue reading

Posted in Law, Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Software, Statistics, Technology, Uncategorized | 7 Comments

My Interview with ITConversations on Reproducible Research

On September 30, I was interviewed by Jon Udell from ITConversations.org in his Interviews with Innovators series, on Reproducibility of Computational Science. Here’s the blurb: “If you’re a writer, a musician, or an artist, you can use Creative Commons licenses … Continue reading

Posted in Intellectual Property, Law, Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, shameless self-promotion, Statistics, Technology | 2 Comments

Optimal Information Disclosure Levels: Data.gov and "Taleb's Criticism"

I was listening to the audio recording of last Friday’s “Scientific Data for Evidence Based Policy and Decision Making” symposium at the National Academies, and was struck by the earnest effort on the part of members of the Whitehouse to … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Internet and Democracy, Law, Open Science, Reproducible Research, Scientific Method, Statistics, Technology | 2 Comments

What's New at Science Foo Camp 2009

SciFoo is a wonderful annual gathering of thinkers about science. It’s an unconference and people who choose to speak do so. Here’s my reaction to a couple of these talks. In Pete Worden’s discussion of modeling future climate change, I … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Developing world, Economics, Open Science, Reproducible Research, Statistics, Talks, Technology | Leave a comment

Bill Gates to Development Researchers: Create and Share Statistics

I was recently in Doha, Qatar, presenting my research on global communication technology use and democratic tendency at ICTD09. I spoke right before the keynote, Bill Gates, whose main point was that when you engage in a goal-oriented activity, such … Continue reading

Posted in Conferences, Developing world, Economics, Human Rights, Internet and Democracy, Middle East, Open Science, Statistics, Talks, Technology | Leave a comment

Wolfram|Alpha Demoed at Harvard: Limits on Human Understanding?

Yesterday Stephen Wolfram gave the first demo of Wolfram|Alpha, coming in May, what he modestly describes as a system to make our stock of human knowledge computable. It includes not just facts, but also our algorithmic knowledge. He says, “Given … Continue reading

Posted in Open Science, Reproducible Research, Statistics, Talks, Technology | 2 Comments

Sunstein speaks on extremism

Cass Sunstein, Professor at Harvard Law School, is speaking today on Extremism: Politics and Law. Related to this topic, he is the author of Nudge, Republic.com 2.0, and Infotopia. He discussed Republic 2.0 with Henry Farrell on this bloggingheads.tv diavlog, … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Law, Media, Statistics, Technology | Leave a comment

Legal Barriers to Open Science: my SciFoo talk

I had an amazing time participating at Science Foo Camp this year. This is a unique conference: there are 200 invitees comprising some of the most innovative thinkers about science today. Most are scientists but not all – there are … Continue reading

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A2K3 Kaltura Award

I am honored and humbled to win the A2K3 Kaltura prize for best paper. Peter Suber posts about it here and gives the abstract. His post also includes a link to a draft of the paper, which can also be … Continue reading

Posted in A2K3, Conferences, Intellectual Property, Open Science, shameless self-promotion, Statistics | Leave a comment

Internet and Cell Phone Use in the Middle East

When people talk about the Internet and Democracy, especially in the context of the Middle East, I wonder just how pervasive the Internet really is in these countries. I made a quick plot of data for Middle Eastern countries from … Continue reading

Posted in Middle East, Statistics, Technology | 1 Comment

John Kelly: Parsing the Political Blogosphere

John Kelly is a doctoral student a Columbia’s School of Communications, a startup founder (Morningside Analytics), as well as doing collaborative work with Berkman. He’s speaking Berkman’s Media Re:public Forum. Kelly says he takes an ecosystem approach to studying the … Continue reading

Posted in Berkman, Conferences, Internet and Democracy, Media, Statistics, Talks | 1 Comment

Book Review: "Development as Freedom" by Amartya Sen

What is a developed country? According to Sen, development should be measured by how much freedom a country has since without freedom people cannot make the choices that allow them to help themselves and others. He defines freedom as an … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Developing world, Economics, Human Rights, Statistics | Leave a comment

Patrick Ball in NYT Magazine

Recently the Berkman Internet and Democracy group hosted a conference on Digital Activism in Istanbul. One of the attendees was Patrick Ball, Chief Scientist and Director of the Human Rights program at Benetech. His work was the focus of a … Continue reading

Posted in Human Rights, Statistics | Leave a comment