Monthly Archive for April, 2009

Wolfram|Alpha Demoed at Harvard: Limits on Human Understanding?

Yesterday Stephen Wolfram gave the first demo of Wolfram|Alpha, coming in May, what he modestly describes as a system to make our stock of human knowledge computable. It includes not just facts, but also our algorithmic knowledge. He says, “Given all the methods, models ,and equations that have been created from science and analysis – take all that stuff and package it so that we can walk up to a website and ask it a question and have it generate the knowledge that we want. … like interacting with an expert.”

It’s ambitious, but so are Wolfram’s previous projects: Mathematica and Mathworld. I remember relying on Mathworld as a grad student – it was excellent, and so I remember when it suddenly disappeared when the content was to be published as a book. In 2002 he published A New Kind of Science, arguing that all processes, including thought, can be viewed as computations and a simple set of rules can describe a complex system. This thinking is clearly evident in Wolfram|Alpha and here are some key examples.
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