Archive for the 'Intellectual Property' Category

Changes in the Research Process Must Come From the Scientific Community, not Federal Regulation

I wrote this piece as an invited policy article for a major journal but they declined to publish it. It’s still very much a draft and they made some suggestions, but since realistically I won’t be able to get back to this for a while and the text is becoming increasingly dated, I thought I would post it here. Enjoy!

Recent U.S. policy changes are mandating a particular vision of scientific communication: public access to data and publications for federally funded research. On February 22, 2013, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Whitehouse released an executive memorandum instructing the major federal funding agencies to develop plans to make both the datasets and research articles resulting from their grants publicly available [1]. On March 5, the House Science, Space, and Technology subcommittee convened a hearing on Scientific Integrity & Transparency and on May 9, President Obama issued an executive order requiring government data to be made openly available to the public [2].

Many in the scientific community have demanded increased data and code disclosure in scholarly dissemination to address issues of reproducibility and credibility in computational science [3-19]. At first blush, the federal policies changes appear to support these scientific goals, but the scope of government action is limited in ways that impair its ability to respond directly to these concerns. The scientific community cannot rely on federal policy to bring about changes that enable reproducible computational research. These recent policy changes must be a catalyst for a well-considered update in research dissemination standards by the scientific community: computational science must move to publication standards that include the digital data and code sufficient to permit others in the field to replicate and verify the results. Authors and journals must be ready to use existing repositories and infrastructure to ensure the communication of reproducible computational discoveries.
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Data access going the way of journal article access? Insist on open data

The discussion around open access to published scientific results, the Open Access movement, is well known. The primary cause of the current situation — journal publishers owning copyright on journal articles and therefore charging for access — stems from authors signing their copyright over to the journals. I believe this happened because authors really didn’t realize what they were doing when they signed away ownership over their work, and had they known they would not have done so. I believe another solution would have been used, such as granting the journal a license to publish i.e. like Science’s readily available alternative license. At some level authors were entering into binding legal contracts without an understanding of the implications and without the right counsel.

I am seeing a similar situation arising with respect to data. It is not atypical for a data producing entity, particularly those in the commercial sphere, to require that researchers with access to the data sign a non-disclosure agreement. This seems to be standard for Facebook data, Elsevier data, and many many others. I’m witnessing researchers grabbing their pens and signing, and like in the publication context, feeling themselves powerless to do otherwise. Again, they are without the appropriate counsel. Even the general counsel’s office at their institution typically sees the GC’s role as protecting the institution against liability, rather than the larger concern of protecting the scholar’s work and the integrity of the scholarly record. What happens when research from these protected datasets is published, and questioned? How can others independently verify the findings? They’ll need access to the data.

There are many legitimate reasons such data may not be able to be publicly released, for example protection of subjects’ privacy (see what happened when Harvard released Facebook data from a study). But as scientists we should be mindful of the need for our published findings to be reproducible. Some commercial data do not come with privacy concerns, only concerns from the company that they are still able to sell the data to other commercial entities, and sometimes not even that. Sometimes lawyers simply want an NDA to minimize any risk to the commercial entity that might arise should the data be released. To me, that seems perfectly rational since they are not stewards of scientific knowledge.

It is also perfectly rational for authors publishing findings based on these data to push back as hard as possible to ensure maximum reproducibility and credibility of their results. Many companies share data with scientists because they seek to deepen goodwill and ties with the academic community, or they are interested in the results of the research. As researchers we should condition our acceptance of the data on its release when the findings are published, if there are no privacy concerns associated with the data. If there are privacy concerns I can imagine ensuring we can share the data in a “walled garden” within which other researchers, but not the public, will be able to access the data and verify results. There are a number of solutions that can bridge the gap between open access to data and an access-blocking NDA (e.g. differential privacy) and as scientists the integrity and reproducibility of our work is a core concern that we have responsibility for in this negotiation for data.

A few template data sharing agreements between academic researchers and data producing companies would be very helpful, if anyone feels like taking a crack at drafting them (Creative Commons?). Awareness of the issue is also important, among researchers, publishers, funders, and data producing entities. We cannot unthinkingly default to a legal situation regarding data that is anathema to scientific progress, as we did with access to scholarly publications.

My Symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting: The Digitization of Science

Yesterday I held a symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington DC, called “The Digitization of Science: Reproducibility and Interdisciplinary Knowledge Transfer,” that was intended to bring attention to how massive computation is changing the practice of science, particularly the lack of reproducibility of published computational scientific results. The fact is, most computational scientific results published today are unverified and unverifiable. I’ve created a page for the event here, with links to slide decks and abstracts. I couldn’t have asked for a better symposium, thanks to the wonderful speakers.

The first speaker was Keith A. Baggerly, who (now famously) tried to verify published results in Nature Medicine and uncovered a series of errors that led to the termination of clinical trials at Duke that were based on the original findings, and the resignation of one of the investigators (his slides). I then spoke about policies for realigning the IP framework scientists are under with their longstanding norms, to permit sharing of code and data (my slides). Fernando Perez described how computational scientists can learn about not only code sharing, quality control, and project management from the Open Source Software, but how they have in fact developed what is in effect a deeply successful system of peer review for code. Code is verified line by line before incorporated into the project, and there are software tools to enable the communication between reviewer and submitted, down to the line of code (his slides).

Michael Reich then presented GenePattern, an OS independent tool developed with Microsoft for creating data analysis pipelines and incorporating them into a Word doc. Once in the document, tools exist to click and recreate the figure from the pipeline and examine what’s been done to the data. Robert Gentlemen advocated the entire research paper as the unit of reproducibility, and David Donoho presented a method for assigning a unique identifier to figures within the paper, that creates a link for each figure and permits its independent reproduction (the slides). The final speaker was Mark Liberman, who showed how the human language technology community had developed a system of open data and code in their efforts to reduce errors in machine understanding of language (his slides). All the talks pushed on delineations of science from non-science, and it was probably best encapsulated with a quote Mark introduced from John Pierce, a Bell Labs executive in 1969, how “To sell suckers, one uses deceit and offers glamor.”

There was some informal feedback, with a prominent person saying that this session was “one of the most amazing set of presentations I have attended in recent memory.” Have a look at all the slides and abstracts, including links and extended abstracts.

Update: Here are some other blog posts on the symposium: Mark Liberman’s blog and Fernando Perez’s blog.

Open Data Dead on Arrival

In 1984 Karl Popper wrote a private letter to an inquirer he didn’t know, responding to enclosed interview questions. The response was subsequently published and in it he wrote, among other things, that:

“Every intellectual has a very special responsibility. He has the privilege and opportunity of studying. In return, he owes it to his fellow men (or ‘to society’) to represent the results of his study as simply, clearly and modestly as he can. The worst thing that intellectuals can do — the cardinal sin — is to try to set themselves up as great prophets vis-a-vis their fellow men and to impress them with puzzling philosophies. Anyone who cannot speak simply and clearly should say nothing and continue to work until he can do so.”

Aside from the offensive sexism in referring to intellectuals as males, there is another way this imperative should be updated for intellectualism today. The movement to make data available online is picking up momentum — as it should — and open code is following suit (see http://mloss.org for example). But data should not be confused with facts, and applying the simple communication that Popper refers to beyond the written or spoken word is the only way open data will produce dividends. It isn’t enough to post raw data, or undocumented code. Data and code should be considered part of intellectual communication, and made as simple as possible for “fellow men” to understand. Just as knowledge of adequate English vocabulary is assumed in the nonquantitative communication Popper refers to, certain basic coding and data knowledge can be assumed as well. This means the same thing as it does in the literary case; the elimination of extraneous information and obfuscating terminology. No need to bury interested parties in an Enron-like shower of bits. It also means using a format for digital communication that is conducive to reuse, such as a flat text file or another non-proprietary format, for example pdf files cannot be considered acceptable to either data or code. Facilitating reproducibility must be the gold standard for data and code release.

And who are these “fellow men”?

Well, fellow men and women that is, but back to the issue. Much of the history of scientific communication has dealt with the question of demarcation of the appropriate group to whom the reasoning behind the findings would be communicated, the definition of the scientific community. Clearly, communication of very technical and specialized results to a layman would take intellectuals’ time away from doing what they do best, being intellectual. On the other hand some investment in explanation is essential for establishing a finding as an accepted fact — assuring others that sufficient error has been controlled for and eliminated in the process of scientific discovery. These others ought to be able to verify results, find mistakes, and hopefully build on the results (or the gaps in the theory) and thereby further our understanding. So there is a tradeoff. Hence the establishment of the Royal Society for example as a body with the primary purpose of discussing scientific experiments and results. Couple this with Newton’s surprise, or even irritation, at having to explain results he put forth to the Society in his one and only journal publication in their journal Philosophical Transactions (he called the various clarifications tedious, and sought to withdraw from the Royal Society and subsequently never published another journal paper. See the last chapter of The Access Principle). There is a mini-revolution underfoot that has escaped the spotlight of attention on open data, open code, and open scientific literature. That is, the fact that the intent is to open to the public. Not open to peers, or appropriately vetted scientists, or selected ivory tower mates, but to anyone. Never before has the standard for communication been “everyone,” in fact quite the opposite. Efforts had traditionally been expended narrowing and selecting the community privileged enough to participate in scientific discourse.

So what does public openness mean for science?

Recall the leaked files from the University of East Anglia’s Climatic Research Unit last November. Much of the information revealed concerned scientifically suspect (and ethically dubious) attempts not to reveal data and methods underlying published results. Although that tack seems to have softened now some initial responses defended the climate scientists’ right to be closed with regard to their methods due to the possibility of “denial of service attacks” – the ripping apart of methodology (recall all science is wrong, an asymptotic progression toward to truth at best) not with the intent of finding meaningful errors that halt the acceptance of findings as facts, but merely to tie up the climate scientists so they cannot attend to real research. This is the same tradeoff as described above. An interpretation of this situation cannot be made without the complicating realization that peer review — the review process that vets articles for publication — doesn’t check computational results but largely operates as if the papers are expounding results from the pre-computational scientific age. The outcome, if computational methodologies are able to remain closed from view, is that they are directly vetted nowhere. Hardly an acceptable basis for establishing facts. My own view is that data and code must be communicated publicly with attention paid to Popper’s admonition: as simply and clearly as possible, such that the results can be replicated. Not participating in dialog with those insufficiently knowledgable to engage will become part of our scientific norms, in fact this is enshrined in the structure of our scientific societies of old. Others can take up those ends of the discussion, on blogs, in digital forums. But public openness is important not just because taxpayers have a right to what they paid for (perhaps they do, but this quickly falls apart since not all the public are technically taxpayers and that seems a wholly unjust way of deciding who shall have access to scientific knowledge and who not, clearly we mean society), but because of the increasing inclusiveness of the scientific endeavor. How do we determine who is qualified to find errors in our scientific work? We don’t. Real problems will get noticed regardless of with whom they originate, many eyes making all bugs shallow. And I expect peer review for journal publishing to incorporate computational evaluation as well.

Where does this leave all the open data?

Unused, unless efforts are expended to communicate the meaning of the data, and to maximize the usability of the code. Data is not synonymous with facts – methods for understanding data, and turning its contents into facts, are embedded within the documentation and code. Take for granted that users understand the coding language or basic scientific computing functions, but clearly and modestly explain the novel contributions. Facilitate reproducibility. Without this data may be open, but will remain de facto in the ivory tower.

Post 3: The OSTP’s call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government

The following comments were posted in response to the OSTP’s call as posted here: http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/default-file/RFI%20Final%20for%20FR.pdf. The first wave, comments posted here, asked for feedback on implementation issues. The second wave requested input on Features and Technology (our post is here). For the third and final wave on Management, Chris Wiggins, Matt Knepley, and I posted the following comments:

Q1: Compliance. What features does a public access policy need to ensure compliance? Should this vary across agencies?

One size does not fit all research problems across all research communities, and a heavy-handed general release requirement across agencies could result in de jure compliance – release of data and code as per the letter of the law – without the extra effort necessary to create usable data and code facilitating reproducibility (and extension) of the results. One solution to this barrier would be to require grant applicants to formulate plans for release of the code and data generated through their research proposal, if funded. This creates a natural mechanism by which grantees (and peer reviewers), who best know their own research environments and community norms, contribute complete strategies for release. This would allow federal funding agencies to gather data on needs for release (repositories, further support, etc.); understand which research problem characteristics engender which particular solutions, which solutions are most appropriate in which settings, and uncover as-yet unrecognized problems particular researchers may encounter. These data would permit federal funding agencies to craft release requirements that are more sensitive to barriers researchers face and the demands of their particular research problems, and implement strategies for enforcement of these requirements. This approach also permits researchers to address confidentiality and privacy issues associated with their research.

Examples:

One exemplary precedent by a UK funding agency is the January 2007 “Policy on data management and sharing”
(http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-us/Policy/Policy-and-position-statements/WTX035043.htm)
adopted by The Wellcome Trust (http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/About-us/index.htm) according to which “the Trust will require that the applicants provide a data management and sharing plan as part of their application; and review these data management and sharing plans, including any costs involved in delivering them, as an integral part of the funding decision.” A comparable policy statement by US agencies would be quite useful in clarifying OSTP’s intent regarding the relationship between publicly-supported research and public access to the research products generated by this support.

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Post 2: The OSTP’s call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government

The following comments were posted in response to the second wave of the OSTP’s call as posted here: http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/default-file/RFI%20Final%20for%20FR.pdf. The first wave, comments posted here and on the OSTP site here (scroll to the second last comment), asked for feedback on implementation issues. The second wave requests input on Features and Technology and Chris Wiggins and I posted the following comments:

We address each of the questions for phase two of OSTP’s forum on public access in turn. The answers generally depend on the community involved and (particularly question 7, asking for a cost estimate) on the scale of implementation. Inter-agency coordination is crucial however in (i) providing a centralized repository to access agency-funded research output and (ii) encouraging and/or providing a standardized tagging vocabulary and structure (as discussed further below).

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Nathan Myhrvold advocates for Reproducible Research on CNN

On yesterday’s edition of Fareed Zakaria’s GPS on CNN former Microsoft CTO and current CEO of Intellectual Ventures Nathan Myhrvold said reproducible research is an important response for climate science in the wake of Climategate, the recent file leak from a major climate modeling center in England (I blogged my response to the leak here). The video is here, see especially 16:27, and the transcript is here.

The OSTP's call for comments regarding Public Access Policies for Science and Technology Funding Agencies Across the Federal Government

The following comments were posted in response to the OSTP’s call as posted here: http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/default-file/RFI%20Final%20for%20FR.pdf:

Open access to our body of federally funded research, including not only published papers but also any supporting data and code, is imperative, not just for scientific progress but for the integrity of the research itself. We list below nine focus areas and recommendations for action.

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My Interview with ITConversations on Reproducible Research

On September 30, I was interviewed by Jon Udell from ITConversations.org in his Interviews with Innovators series, on Reproducibility of Computational Science.

Here’s the blurb: “If you’re a writer, a musician, or an artist, you can use Creative Commons licenses to share your digital works. But how can scientists license their work for sharing? In this conversation, Victoria Stodden — a fellow with Science Commons — explains to host Jon Udell why scientific output is different and how Science Commons aims to help scientists share it freely.”

Stuart Shieber and the Future of Open Access Publishing

Back in February Harvard adopted a mandate requiring its faculty member to make their research papers available within a year of publication. Stuart Shieber is a computer science professor at Harvard and responsible for proposing the policy. He has since been named director of Harvard’s new Office for Scholarly Comminication.

On November 12 Shieber gave a talk entitled “The Future of Open Access — and How to Stop It” to give an update on where things stand after the adoption of the open access mandate. Open access isn’t just something that makes sense from an ethical standpoint, as Shieber points out that (for-profit) journal subscription costs have risen out of proportion with inflation costs and out of proportion with the costs of nonprofit journals. He notes that the cost per published page in a commercial journal is six times that of the nonprofits. With the current library budget cuts, open access — meaning both access to articles directly on the web and shifting subscriptions away from for-profit journals — is something that appears financially unavoidable.

Here’s the business model for an Open Access (OA) journal: authors pay a fee upfront in order for their paper to be published. Then the issue of the journal appears on the web (possibly also in print) without an access fee. Conversely, traditional for-profit publishing doesn’t charge the author to publish, but keeps the journal closed and charges subscription fees for access.

Shieber recaps Harvard’s policy:

1. The faculty member grants permission to the University to make the article available through an OA repository.

2. There is a waiver for articles: a faculty member can opt out of the OA mandate at his or her sole discretion. For example, if you have a prior agreement with a publisher you can abide by it.

3. The author themselves deposits the article in the repository.

Shieber notes that the policy is also because it allows Harvard to make a collective statement of principle, systematically provide metadata about articles, it clarifies the rights accruing to the article, it allows the university to facilitate the article deposit process, it allows the university to negotiate collectively, and having the mandate be opt out rather than opt in might increase rights retention at the author level.

So the concern Shieber set up in his talk is whether standards for research quality and peer review will be weakened. Here’s how the dystopian argument runs:

1. all universities enact OA policies
2. all articles become OA
3. libraries cancel subscriptions
4. prices go up on remaining journals
5. these remaining journals can’t recoup their costs
6. publishers can’t adapt their business model
7. so the journals and the logistics of peer review they provide, disappear

Shieber counters this argument: 1 through 5 are good because journals will start to feel some competitive pressure. What would be bad is if publishers cannot change their way of doing business. Shieber thinks that even if this is so it will have the effect of pushing us towards OA journals, which provide the same services, including peer review, as the traditional commercial journals.

But does the process of getting there cause a race to the bottom? The argument goes like this: since OA journals are paid by the number of articles published they will just publish everything, thereby destroying standards. Shieber argues this won’t happen because there is price discrimination among journals – authors will pay more to publish in the more prestigious journals. For example, PLOS costs about $3k, Biomed Central about $1000, and Scientific Publishers International is $96 for an article. Shieber also makes an argument that Harvard should have a fund to support faculty who wish to publish in an OA journal and have no other way to pay the fee.

This seems to imply that researchers with sufficient grant funding or falling under his proposed Harvard publication fee subsidy, would then be immune to the fee pressure and simply submit to the most prestigious journal and work their way down the chain until their paper is accepted. This also means that editors/reviewers decide what constitutes the best scientific articles by determining acceptance.

But is democratic representation in science a goal of OA? Missing from Shieber’s described market for scientific publications is any kind of feedback from the readers. The content of these journals, and the determination of prestige, is defined solely by the editors and reviewers. Maybe this is a good thing. But maybe there’s an opportunity to open this by allowing readers a voice in the market. This could done through ads or a very tiny fee on articles – both would give OA publishers an incentive to respond to the preferences of the readers. Perhaps OA journals should be commercial in the sense of profit-maximizing: they might have a reason to listen to readers and might be more effective at maximizing their prestige level.

This vision of OA publishing still effectively excludes researchers who are unable to secure grants or are not affiliated with a university that offers a publication subsidy. The dream behind OA publishing is that everyone can read the articles, but to fully engage in the intellectual debate quality research must still find its way into print, and at the appropriate level of prestige, regardless of the affiliation of the researcher. This is the other side of OA that is very important for researchers from the developing world or thinkers whose research is not mainstream (see, for example, Garrett Lisi a high impact researcher who is unaffiliated with an institution).

The OA publishing model Shieber describes is a clear step forward from the current model where journals are only accessible by affiliates of universities who have paid the subscription fees. It might be worth continuing to move toward an OA system where, not only can anyone access publications, but any quality research is capable of being published, regardless of the author’s affiliation and wealth. To get around the financial constraints one approach might be to allow journals to fund themselves through ads, or provide subsidies to certain researchers. This also opens up the idea of who decides what is quality research.

A2K3: Opening Scientific Research Requires Societal Change

In the A2K3 panel on Open Access to Science and Research, Eve Gray, from the Centre for Educational Technology, University of Cape Town, sees the Open Access movement as a real societal change. Accordingly she shows us a picture of Nelson Mandela and asks us to think about his release from prison and the amount of change that ushered in. She also asks us to consider whether or not Mandela is an international person or a local person. She sees a parallel with how South African society changed with Mandela and the change people are advocation toward open access to research knowledge. She shows a worldmapper.org map of countries distorted by the amount of (copyrighted) scientific research publications. South Africa looks small. She blames this on South Africa’s willingness to uphold colonial traditions in copyright law and norms in knowledge dissemination. She says this happens almost unquestioningly, and in South Africa to rise in the research world you are expected to publish in ‘international’ journals – the prestigious journals are not South African, she says (I am familiar with this attitude from my own experience in Canada. The top American journals and schools were considered the holy grail. When I asked about attending a top American graduate school I was laughed at by a professor and told that maybe it could happen, if perhaps I had an Olympic gold medal.) She states that for real change in this area to come about people have to recognize that they must mediate a “complex meshing” of policies: at the university level, and the various government levels, norms and the individual scientist level… just as Mandela had to mediate a large number of complex policies at a variety of different levels in order to bring about the change he did.

Legal Barriers to Open Science: my SciFoo talk

I had an amazing time participating at Science Foo Camp this year. This is a unique conference: there are 200 invitees comprising some of the most innovative thinkers about science today. Most are scientists but not all – there are publishers, science reporters, scientific entrepreneurs, writers on science, and so on. I met old friends there and found many amazing new ones.

One thing that I was glad to see was the level of interest in Open Science. Some of the top thinkers in this area were there and I’d guess at least half the participants are highly motivated by this problem. There were sessions on reporting negative results, the future of the scientific method, reproducibility in science. I organized a session with Michael Nielsen on overcoming barriers in open science. I spoke about the legal barriers and O’Reilly Media has made the talk available here.

I have papers forthcoming on this topic you can find on my website.

A2K3 Kaltura Award

I am honored and humbled to win the A2K3 Kaltura prize for best paper. Peter Suber posts about it here and gives the abstract. His post also includes a link to a draft of the paper, which can also be found here: Enabling Reproducible Research: Open Licensing For Scientific Innovation. I’d love comments and feedback although please be aware that since the paper is forthcoming in the International Journal of Communications Law and Policy it will very likely undergo changes. Thank you to Kaltura.com and the entire A2K3 committee. I’m very happy to be here in Geneva and enjoying every minute. :)

A2K3: A World Trade Agreement for Knowledge?

Thiru Balasubramanian, Geneva Representative for Knowledge Ecology International presents a proposal (from a forthcoming paper by James Love and Manon Ress) for a WTO treaty on knowledge (so far all WTO agreements extend to private goods only). Since information is a public good (nonrival and nonexcludable), we will have a “market failure” if single countries act alone: hence the undersupply of global public goods. The WTO creates binding agreements and thus such an agreement for public goods such as knowledge creates large collective benefits and high costs to acting against them. Such a WTO agreement would outline and influence norms. Why do this within the WTO? There are strong enforcement mechanisms here. Are we really undersupplying open and free knowledge? I can think of several scientific examples. Balasubramaniam doesn’t dig in to what such an agreement would look like and seems quite complex. Thinking about this might provide a coherent framework for approaching free information issues globally.

A2K3: Access to Knowledge as a Human Right

Building on the opening remarks, the second panel addresses Human right and Access to Knowledge. Caroline Dommen, director of 3D, an advocacy group promoting human rights consideration in trade agreements, emphasizes the need for metrics: how can we tell how open countries are? She suggests borrowing from the experience with human rights measurement. For example measuring the availability of a right, nondiscrimination in access, economic access (is it affordable?), acceptability or quality or the available good. She also suggests using the 4A human rights approach of 1) respect 2) protect and 3) fulfill the rights. There are corollary obligations: 1) non-discrimination 2) adequate process (including redress of violated rights) 3) participation 4) effective remedy.

Marisella Ouma, Kenyan team researcher for the African Copyright and Access to Knowledge Project, says that most African countries have had copyright laws since independence (starting with Ghana in 1957). She is concerned about the educational aspect of access to knowledge and related results of the educational materials access index: the highest ranking is Egypt and the lowest is Mozambique. So, why? What are the issues? Ouma notes that these countries have the laws but not strong policies: she asserts they need a copyright policy that acknowledges the basic fundamental right to education so there isn’t a conflict between property rights and the right to access educational information. She is concerned that people don’t understand copyright law and this makes advocacy of their rights difficult. She is also concerned that policy is not comprehensive enough: For example in Kenya or Uganda, the education policy is limited to basic education. She also describes the sad situation of there being billions of dollars available to build libraries but no money to stock them with information. Something is really wrong here. She notes that wireless internet is important for this, and how many people really have access? So how do they access the knowledge? she asks.

A2K3: Tim Hubbard on Open Science

In the first panel at A2K3 on the history, impact, and future of the global A2K movement, Tim Hubbard, a genetics researcher, laments that scientists tend to carry out their work in a closed way and thus very little data is released. In fact he claims that biologists used to deliberately mess up images so that they could not be reproduced! But apparently journals are more demanding now and this problem has largely been corrected (for example Nature’s 2006 standards on image fraud). He says that openness in science needs to happen before publication, the traditional time when scientists release their work. But this is a tough problem. Data must be released in such a way that others can understand and use it. This parallels the argument made in the opening remarks about the value of net neutrality as preserving an innovation platform: in order for data to be used it must be open in the sense that it permits further innovation. He says we now have Open Genome Data but privacy issues are pertinent: even summaries of the data can be backsolved to identify individuals. He asks for better encryption algorithms to protect privacy. In the meantime he proposes two other solutions. We could just stop worrying about the privacy of our genetic data, just like we don’t hide our race or gender. Failing that, he wants to mine the UK’s National Health Service’s patient records through an “honest broker” which is an intermediary that runs programs and scripts on the data that researchers submit. The data are hidden from the researcher and only accessed through the intermediary. Another problem this solves is the enormity of the released data that can prevent interested people from moving the data or analyzing it. This has broad implications as Hubbard points out – the government could access their CCTV video recordings to find drivers who’ve let their insurance lapse, but not track other possibly privacy violating aspects of drivers’ visible presence on the road. Hubbard is touching on what might be the most important part of the Access to Knowledge movement – how to make the access meaningful without destroying incentives to be open.

Access to Knowledge 3: Opening Remarks

I’m at my first Access to Knowledge conference in Geneva and I’ve never felt so important. Walking to the Centre International de Conférences in Geneva I passed the UN High Commission for Refugees and I’m sitting in an enormous tiered conference room with translation headphones and plush leather chairs. Maybe I’m easily impressed, but this is really my first exposure to influencing policy through any means other than academic idea generation and publication. A2K3 is held literally across the street from the World Intellectual Property Organization‘s headquarters and the focus is changing the global intellectual policy landscape.

So that means there are more lawyers and activists here than I am used to seeing at the usual academic conferences. The introductory remarks reflect this: Sisule Musungu lists the multitude of groups involved such as eiFL, EFF, OSI, for example. Google and Kaltura are the only corporate sponsors. Laura DeNardis, the executive director of Information Society Project at Yale (the group primarily responsible for A2K3) is giving opening remarks. Laura makes the point that technical standards contain deep political stances on knowledge sharing and dissemintation so the debate isn’t just about regulation any more. This means A2K is not just about laws and treaties, but also about the nature of the communciation technologies. Many of our discussions about net neutrality at Berkman note this fact, and in followup remarks Jack Balkin, the founding directory of the Yale ISP, makes this observation. He states that the A2K movement brings attention to much of International Trade Law that flies under most people’s radars, especially how it impacts the free flow of information, particularly on developing countries. A2K is at core about justice and human rights, since more and more wealth creation is coming from information tools in our information-driven world. This is clearly true: think of the success and power of Google – an information company. A2K is at least in part a reaction to the increasingly strong correlation between wealth and access to information. Balkin relates the FCC ruling preventing Comcast from discriminating between packets based on application or content, meaning that this movement is really about the decentralization of innovation: he states that without net neutrality innovation would be dominated by a small number of firms who would only allow innovations that benefit them directly. The A2K movement is about bringing more minds to solve our greatest problems, and this also engenders a debate about control, most deeply the control people can effect on their own lives: “will people be the master’s of themselves or will they be under the control of others?” The internet is a general purpose tool facilitating communication however people see fit, so the internet can be understood as a commons in that we can use it and build on it for our own self-determined purposes.