Monthly Archive for September, 2013

Changes in the Research Process Must Come From the Scientific Community, not Federal Regulation

I wrote this piece as an invited policy article for a major journal but they declined to publish it. It’s still very much a draft and they made some suggestions, but since realistically I won’t be able to get back to this for a while and the text is becoming increasingly dated, I thought I would post it here. Enjoy!

Recent U.S. policy changes are mandating a particular vision of scientific communication: public access to data and publications for federally funded research. On February 22, 2013, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Whitehouse released an executive memorandum instructing the major federal funding agencies to develop plans to make both the datasets and research articles resulting from their grants publicly available [1]. On March 5, the House Science, Space, and Technology subcommittee convened a hearing on Scientific Integrity & Transparency and on May 9, President Obama issued an executive order requiring government data to be made openly available to the public [2].

Many in the scientific community have demanded increased data and code disclosure in scholarly dissemination to address issues of reproducibility and credibility in computational science [3-19]. At first blush, the federal policies changes appear to support these scientific goals, but the scope of government action is limited in ways that impair its ability to respond directly to these concerns. The scientific community cannot rely on federal policy to bring about changes that enable reproducible computational research. These recent policy changes must be a catalyst for a well-considered update in research dissemination standards by the scientific community: computational science must move to publication standards that include the digital data and code sufficient to permit others in the field to replicate and verify the results. Authors and journals must be ready to use existing repositories and infrastructure to ensure the communication of reproducible computational discoveries.
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