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My Symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting: The Digitization of Science

Yesterday I held a symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington DC, called “The Digitization of Science: Reproducibility and Interdisciplinary Knowledge Transfer,” that was intended to bring attention to how massive computation is changing the practice of science, particularly the lack of reproducibility of published computational scientific results. The fact is, most computational scientific results published today are unverified and unverifiable. I’ve created a page for the event here, with links to slide decks and abstracts. I couldn’t have asked for a better symposium, thanks to the wonderful speakers.

The first speaker was Keith A. Baggerly, who (now famously) tried to verify published results in Nature Medicine and uncovered a series of errors that led to the termination of clinical trials at Duke that were based on the original findings, and the resignation of one of the investigators (his slides). I then spoke about policies for realigning the IP framework scientists are under with their longstanding norms, to permit sharing of code and data (my slides). Fernando Perez described how computational scientists can learn about not only code sharing, quality control, and project management from the Open Source Software, but how they have in fact developed what is in effect a deeply successful system of peer review for code. Code is verified line by line before incorporated into the project, and there are software tools to enable the communication between reviewer and submitted, down to the line of code (his slides).

Michael Reich then presented GenePattern, an OS independent tool developed with Microsoft for creating data analysis pipelines and incorporating them into a Word doc. Once in the document, tools exist to click and recreate the figure from the pipeline and examine what’s been done to the data. Robert Gentlemen advocated the entire research paper as the unit of reproducibility, and David Donoho presented a method for assigning a unique identifier to figures within the paper, that creates a link for each figure and permits its independent reproduction (the slides). The final speaker was Mark Liberman, who showed how the human language technology community had developed a system of open data and code in their efforts to reduce errors in machine understanding of language (his slides). All the talks pushed on delineations of science from non-science, and it was probably best encapsulated with a quote Mark introduced from John Pierce, a Bell Labs executive in 1969, how “To sell suckers, one uses deceit and offers glamor.”

There was some informal feedback, with a prominent person saying that this session was “one of the most amazing set of presentations I have attended in recent memory.” Have a look at all the slides and abstracts, including links and extended abstracts.

Update: Here are some other blog posts on the symposium: Mark Liberman’s blog and Fernando Perez’s blog.